It’s time to rejoice in the fact that you can once again visit museums in LA! Give yourself a little bit of time to research and plan, and you’ll be able to go on a fun museum day with friends or family.

Here are some of the best museums in Los Angeles.

The Broad Museum

Located in Downtown LA, The Broad is 120,000 square feet of sculptures, canvases, and unique installations that will tantalize your senses from beginning to finish.

Things to look out for? Well one of them is definitely Jeff Koons’ famous giant balloon animal— or Andy Warhol’s “Campbell’s Soup Can.”

Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens

The legacy of industrialist Henry E. Huntington is now one of the region’s most attractive attractions. It’s also a destination that necessitates an entire day if you want to fully explore it: There’s a lot to see between the art, the library collections, and the sprawled outdoor spaces, and most of it is better savored at leisure rather than as part of a day-long rush.

Californian African American Museum

CAAM displays both traditional and contemporary African American art and how they’ve shaped our cultural landscape today. Located in Exposition Park, it shares its home with several other museums— so it’s a great opportunity to spend an entire day in the area to immerse yourself in some of LA’s finest art.

Hammer Museum

Armand Hammer established this museum in 1990, mostly to hold his personal collection, and it opened just three weeks before his death. Now, the free UCLA partner institution hosts exciting exhibitions of modern art, photography, and design, frequently with an emphasis on local artists (most notably with its “Made in L.A.” biennial).

The exhibitions are augmented by the Hammer’s public events calendar, which is undoubtedly one of the best in town, including free talks, concerts, and movies.

Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

The Natural History Museum is a vast collection of nature and culture. This includes a Dinosaur Hall, a Gems and Minerals exhibit, and even the history of LA called “Becoming Los Angeles.” Additionally, there are exhibits that cater to all types of animal lovers, and even pop-up exhibits.

Getty Center

What is now known as the Getty Villa (a coastal estate loaded with antiquities that is also well worth a visit) housed the J. Paul Getty Trust’s large art collection for decades.

The Getty Center, on the other hand, debuted in 1997. The finished result is a stunning complex of travertine and white metal-clad pavilions housing beautiful French furniture, identifiable Impressionist artifacts, and rotating exhibitions.

Its relative inaccessibility is more than offset by free entrance and breathtaking views stretching from the hills and the seashore in the west to Downtown in the east. It is closed on Mondays, but you will not be disappointed if you visit on any other day.